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AYURVEDIC COOKING

"THE BEAUTY OF AYURVEDIC COOKING IS THAT AT IT’S CORE ARE FUNDAMENTAL PRINCIPLES WHICH CAN THEN BE APPLIED TO ANY TYPE OR STYLE OF COOKING – ALLOWING FOR FLEXIBILITY AND ENJOYMENT AROUND THE RITUAL OF FOOD PREPARATION AND EATING."

- Fire Sanders

Below we present; 

  • Useful websites for new ideas for Ayurvedic cooking
  • Useful Ayurvedic cookbooks and
  • Some of our own recipes

All of our own recipes that we present below are quck, easy to make meals that can be prepared within 30 minutes or less.

AYURVEDIC COOKING: USEFUL WEBSITES

AYURVEDIC COOKING: USEFUL WEBSITES

Whilst we love to cook according to Ayurvedic principles, we so love and respect to work of others who have done some amazing work in promoting education of Ayurvedic cooking.

There are so many ways to enjoy Ayurvedic cooking. Here we link some other well known and established resources for Ayurvedic cooking ideas. Enjoy!

The Ayurvedic Institute https://www.ayurveda.com/resou...

Divine Taste for Body Mind and. Soul https://www.divinetaste.com/ca...

Jasmine Hemsley https://www.jasminehemsley.com/recipes-1

Kripalu Centre fro Yoga and Health https://kripalu.org/resources/...

Maharishi Ayurveda Recipes: https://www.mapi.com/ayurvedic...

AYURVEDIC COOKBOOKS

HEAVEN'S BANQUET by MIRIAM HOSPODAR

Written with the support of the Maharishi Ayur-Veda Institute, this comprehensive cookbook shows how to incorporate the timeless principles of Ayurveda into the twenty-first century kitchen.

A result of Miriam Kasin Hospodar's twenty-year culinary journey, Heaven's Banquet draws from a rich palette of international cuisines and teaches you how to match your diet to your mind-body type for maximum health and well-being. It contains over 700 surprisingly simple recipes, ranging from Thai Corn Fritters and Asian-Cajun Eggplant Gumbo to West African Avocado Mousse and Mocha-Spice Cake with Coffee Cream Frosting.

Readers will discover the most effective methods of preparing food, the benefits of eating seasonally for invidual types, and how to create a diet for the entire family. There are special sections on how to lose weight and control sugar sensitivity, a questionnaire to help determine mind-body type, and essential ingredients for a well-stocked Ayurvedic kitchen.

KRIPALU KITCHEN: NOURISHING FOOD FOR BODY AND SOUL by JEREMY ROCK SMITH

A lavishly illustrated cookbook featuring 125 delicious, easy-to-prepare, revitalizing, and detoxifying recipes from the executive chef at North America's largest yoga-based healing and education center.The Kripalu Center for Yoga & Health, nestled in the mountains of western Massachusetts, attracts more than fifty thousand people a year. Guests flock not only to deepen their yoga practice but also to experience the healing power of its famously delicious food. Now you can bring Kripalu's most popular dishes to your own table! Kripalu's longtime and popular executive chef, Jeremy Rock Smith, embraces a mindful approach to eating and a seasonal approach to cooking. In The Kripalu Kitchen, he offers 125 easy-to-follow, mouthwatering recipes, dozens of variations, and countless smart eating strategies designed for a variety of dietary preferences-from vegan and vegetarian to gluten-free, grain-free, dairy-free, and sugar-free. The 5-ingredient and 30-minute recipes ensure that even the busiest of us can enjoy this phenomenal food. Honoring the wisdom of Ayurvedic healing practices,

The Kripalu Kitchen also includes a simple test to determine your personal nutrition profile, or dosha, and every recipe is marked to guide you toward the optimal diet for your type. From restorative breakfast ideas to international twists on popular favorites to comforting baked goods, The Kripalu Kitchen will revitalize your body and nourish your soul.

EVERYDAY AYURVEDA COOKING FOR A CALM, CLEARM MIND by KATE O'DONNELL

Balance your mind through the foods you eat. Seasonal, healthy recipes based on traditional Ayurvedic wisdom to benefit our states of mind--from the author of The Everyday Ayurveda Cookbook.

Did you know food can be used not only to promote the health of the body, but also the mind? Ayurveda, India's ancient healing system, describes the three major energies of this universe that affect our mind- Sattva promotes a state of clarity and calm; Rajas stimulates and increases reactivity and excitability; Tamas promotes dull, slow, and stagnant states of mind. This knowledge of how to choose the right foods to balance our states of mind can be used to treat ailments such as sleep difficulties, anxiety, and depression.

After an introduction to Ayurveda and the mind and body connection, the recipes are organized into three parts- Recipes for Clarity focuses on cultivating Sattva; Recipes for Relaxation focuses on managing Rajas; and Recipes for Vitality focuses on motivating Tamas. Showcasing seasonal, whole, unprocessed foods, the recipes work to help maintain consistent energy and an inspired state, while also calming feelings of over-stimulation and building energy if feeling sluggish.

THE EVERYDAY AYURVEDA COOKBOOK by KATE O'DONNELL

Eat delicious seasonal food, balance the body, and heal the gut with simplified, traditional Ayurvedic wisdom and over 100 simple recipes designed to get you cooking in the kitchen.

Even the simplest Ayurveda practices complement Western medicine because of their focus on righting Even the simplest Ayurveda practices complement Western medicine because of their focus on righting imbalance before it creates disease. Keeping digestion on track is the key to health in Ayurveda, and eating natural, homemade foods in accordance with personal constitution and changes in environment is often all that is needed to bring a body back into balance. 

The Everyday Ayurveda Cookbook inspires yogis and nonyogis alike to get into the kitchen and explore this time-honored system of seasonal eating for health and nourishment.Ditching processed food and learning to eat well at home are the first steps you can take to relieving imbalance. The Everyday Ayurveda Cookbook removes many of the obstacles by showing you how straightforward and accessible preparing your own delicious, seasonal meals can be. Season by season, learn how the changing weather and qualities in your environment both mirror and influence your body and appetite. Lifestyle advice on meal planning, self-care regimens, and how to ensure health during the change of seasons is included throughout. And the no-fuss recipes will get you eager to cook.

To expand your cooking repertoire, you'll also learn foundational "everyday" recipes that can be adapted to any season and any dosha- once you understand the blueprint of a basic dish, you can recreate it in your kitchen year-round, using seasonal produce, grains, and flavors for health and nourishment.

A LIFE OF BALANCE by MAYA TIWARI

This book is a profound but practical testament to the healing power of balanced living and shows how Ayurveda's ancient principles of health can help you achieve the highest levels of physical, emotional, and spiritual well-being. Cancer survivor Maya Tiwari provides a thorough profile of the seven body types and the foods best suited to each. Her book is the first to include a complete discussion of the personality or psychospiritual attributes of the Ayurvedic body types, as well as food charts, seasonal menus, and recommended daily routines for each type. A chapter on sadhanas focuses on activities of the hearth, home, garden, and community that activate our "cognitive memory" of right living. An extensive section of uncomplicated recipes, keyed to the body types, and another on home remedies help provide a painless transition to a healthier and more fulfilling lifestyle.

EAT FEEL FRESH: A CONTEMPORARY PLANT-BASED AYURVEDIC COOKBOOK by SAHARA ROSE KETABI

The ancient science of Ayurveda teaches that food is divine medicine with the power to heal--but the best foods for one person may not be beneficial to another. Unlike many diets with rigid, one-size-fits-all guidelines, Ayurveda is a lifestyle that recognizes the ever-changing needs of each individual. Join author Sahara Rose on a journey to wellness and discover how to eat according to your body's specific needs. Identify your dosha, or mind-body type, and find out what foods are best for your body. Learn how changes in season and climate affect your digestion and how to adjust what you eat accordingly. 

Rather than focusing on calories, you'll focus on food qualities. Rather than focusing on macronutrients, you'll focus on tastes--and you'll feel better than ever.Fall in love with cooking as you explore more than 100 plant-based, gluten- and dairy-free recipes for every meal of the day, including contemporary twists on classic Ayurvedic cuisine, such as turmeric-ginger quinoa kitchari and gut-healing seaweed broth. Packed with practical guidance and beautiful photography, Eat Feel Fresh integrates traditional Ayurvedic wisdom with contemporary nutritional science, and invites you to change your relationship with food and connect with your highest self.

AYUREVDIC BUTTERMILK

MAKING AYURVEDIC BUTTERMILK

Ayurveda considers buttermilk to be an elixir for helping with digestion and the assimilation of nutrients, and is a staple for many who suffer from digestive complaints and poor digestion. In Ayurvedic practice, it is also used widely for both prevention of disease and controlling the symptoms of imbalances and health conditions.

Traditionally, buttermilk is the liquid leftover after whole milk has been churned into butter. However, in modern society, buttermilk can be made from plain yoghurt (unsweetened, unflavoured), and preferably organic where possible.

Whilst there are several different types of buttermilk, which are prepared with varying quantities of water, fat content, and spices, one of the easiest to make is the following. It is also tridoshic (balances Vata, Pitta and Kapha).

1/4 cup plain yoghurt
1 cup water room temperature water
small pinch rock salt
¼ teaspoon cumin
¼ teaspoon cardamon or cinnamon
1 punch turmeric

Mix well in a blender for 2 minutes.

- For those with a Kapha imbalance, add a pinch of black pepper and dry ginger before blending, and remove the froth at the top (which is the fat content) after blending.
- For those with a low Pitta imbalance or of if you are consuming buttermilk during summer, add jaggery* or some raw sugar to stop aggravating Pitta dosha.

One of the easiest ways to take buttermilk is to make a batch in the morning and have ¼ glass just after meals. Make sure you drink it at room temperature and not chilled.

*Jaggery should be avoided for those with eczema, ulcerative colitis, and diabetes
 Buttermilk should be avoided for individuals with high Pitta conditions

MAKING GHEE

AYURVEDIC SELF CARE: MAKING GHEE

Ghee, or clarified butter is prepared by heating butter to remove water content and then filtering out the precipitated milk solids.

Traditionally, Ayurveda considered ghee to be the healthiest source of edible fats, and has been used in cooking (as well as for other medicinal purposes) for centuries. Whilst modern scientific research on the benefits of ghee (specifically) is currently in its infancy, ghee does have one of the highest ‘smoke points’ (1) of any of the oils, which does make it a viable option - when used in moderation - in cooking.

The ‘smoke point’ of an oil refers to the temperature where the fats start to break down and form unhealthy compounds (a.k.a., free radicals).

In our household, ghee has replaced other sources of cooking oils and we make our own ghee instead of buying it. Here, we show the method of how to make ghee yourself at home.

(1)  Kumar, Anil & Naik, Satya. (2018). Ghee: Its Properties, Importance and Health Benefits.

INGREDIENTS

-       250g of organic unsalted butter (I prefer butter from an organic store rather than the supermarket as I find I get a better quality ghee from this).

METHOD:

-       Note: Do not leave the kitchen whilst you are doing this as you need to carefully watch for the different stages so you know when the ghee is ready. Also, do not use a spoon to stir the ghee when making (important).

-       I have broken the process up as this makes it easier for people when they are first learning about what changes occur in the saucepan and what to look out for.

-       One 250g block of butter takes about 5-7 minutes or so to complete the process.

Stage 1

-       Take 250g of organic unsalted butter and place it in a saucepan.

-       Heat this on low to medium flame until it fully melts.

-       Turn the heat down to a very low boil.

-       At this stage the butter will be opaque and may begin to have a white froth on top, and will look like melted foam. You will also hear lots of gurgling/bubbly sounds.

Stage 2

-       The froth lessens but you will still see it on top. The butter looks to be a little less opaque. Larger bubbles begin to rise to the surface from the base of the pan.

Stage 3

-       A light top layer of froth is visible, with the bubbles rising from the bottom of the pan becoming noticeably smaller. Here, the separation starts to occur from the solids (lactose) from the fats (ghee) and if you look carefully you will see this happening.

Stage 4

-       The ghee starts to become clear. You will start to see the dregs of lactose solids forming at the base of the saucepan (tip the pan a little to see this). There may also be a slight layer of foam still at the top.

Stage 5

-       The bubbles become really small and look shiny to the eye. There will be a shift in the smell of the ghee – and you will now smell something that is like buttered popcorn. When this occurs, your ghee is ready. Take the ghee off the heat.

-       If you have really brown dregs at the base of the saucepan and the ghee is darkish in colour, and/or there is a nutty smell to the ghee, then you have overcooked it.

Stage 6

-       Let the ghee cool a little in the pan for 5-10 minutes or so. Then strain it through a cheesecloth into a clean and fully dry jar.

Ghee can be kept on the kitchen shelf and does not need refrigeration per se. Always use a clean, dry spoon when ladling out ghee from the jar, otherwise you will create an environment that will allow bacteria to grow and spoil the ghee.

If you want your ghee to have a real golden colour to it, add in some turmeric powder when making the ghee.

Please note: This post is for educational purposes only, and does not in any way replace dietary and/or medical advice or care.

A SPICED EVENING DRINK TO AID SLEEPING

AYURVEDIC SELF-CARE: WARM MILK AND NUTMEG DRINK

According to Ayurveda, nutmeg is a heating spice that has sedative properties, which aids in balancing the nervous system, and also acts as a digestive stimulant, helping to improve digestion. Research also indicates that nutmeg with these sedative properties, also can aid in a better night’s sleep (1).

Warm milk, according to Ayurveda, is one of the ultimate nourishing foods, promoting healthy tissues, a balanced nervous system, and overall health for body and mind. Modern research - although this research to date is limited - has shown that tryptophan in milk (and other protein containing foods) (2) plays a significant role in production of the neurotransmitter serotonin, which helps to boost moods, promote relaxation and works as a precursor in the production of melatonin - the sleep hormone.

This drink is best taken an hour before going to bed and 2-3 hours after your evening meal.

INGREDIENTS

  • 1 cup of full cream milk – preferably organic or biodynamic (Non-dairy milk can also be used)
  • Pinch of nutmeg powder
  • Pinch of cinnamon (optional)
  • Jaggery or raw honey to taste


DIRECTIONS:

Add the milk, and nutmeg and cinnamon to a saucepan and bring this to the boil on a med-low heat.
Allow it to simmer for 2-3 minutes on low flame.
Pour into a mug and allow to cool a little. Then add in the honey** or jaggery. 

** According to Ayurveda, when honey is heated or cooked, it changes its properties to make it more toxic to the body.

(1)  Sherry, C.J., Burnett, R.E. Enhancement of ethanol-induced sleep by whole oil of nutmeg. Experientia 34, 492–493 (1978). https://doi.org/10.1007/BF0193...

(2)  Friedman M. Analysis, Nutrition, and Health Benefits of Tryptophan. Int J Tryptophan Res. 2018 Sep 26;11:1178646918802282. doi: 10.1177/1178646918802282. PMID: 30275700; PMCID: PMC6158605.

Please note: This post is for educational purposes only, and does not in any way replace dietary, and/or medical advice or care.

KITCHARI

AYURVEDIC COOKING: KITCHARI

Kitchari is an ancient Ayurvedic recipe that means means mixture - usually of two grains. Kitchari is particularly nourishing and is considered to be very easy to digest for the digestive system - which helps give the body a break from the regular foods that we tend to eat and helps it to replenish and reset. I cook it often, especially when my digestive system starts to feel heavy and sluggish. I find it to be a great reset button before starting a new week.

INGREDIENTS
2 cups basmati rice
2 cups mung dal/beans (split yellow)
8 cups (approx.) water
½ to ¼ inch ginger root, finely chopped
Heaped teaspoon organic/vegan stock powder
2 tsp. ghee
¼ tsp. coriander powder
¼ tsp. whole cumin seeds
¼ tsp. turmeric powder
1 pinch asafoetida (hing) - optional
Handful of fresh cilantro leaves - optional
Cup assorted vegetables

PREPARATION
Soak the mung beans overnight.
Rinse the rice and mung beans separately in at least 2 changes of water.
To a saucepan add the ghee and spices and allow to saute on low heat.
Then add 8 cups of water, rice, mung dal, veggies and organic stock powder and cook covered on low heat (preferably without lid) until it becomes soft.
If need be, add a little salt and pepper to taste.

USING HONEY

AYURVEDIC COOKING: HONEY

In Ayurveda, honey is revered for its highly nutritional and medicinal properties. However, there is one fundamental principle that Ayurveda is very specific on: honey should never be consumed after heating (or cooking). According to Ayurveda, when cooked, honey becomes equivalent to a glue-like substance. The honey molecules then tend to adhere to mucous membranes in the digestive tract, producing toxins, called Ama (undigested food), which then become the root cause of ill health.

Ayurveda advocates the use of raw honey, which is not subjected to any sort of heat processing, and which contains all of its natural nutrients. and

Therefore, it should not be used it in baking or cooking, and only add it to beverages when the drink has cooled down to a drinkable temperature.

A 2010 study showed that heating honey does alter its chemical composition, by deteriorating its quality and loses its essential enzymes and nutrients (1).

Recent studies have also shown that when honey is heated or cooked, the chemical composition of the sugars and fructose are altered, causing a browning reaction known as the Maillard Reaction. This heating then leads to the increase in the production of a substance known as 5-Hydroxymethylfurfural (HMF). HMF is known as a toxic substance that is formed whenever sugars are heated or caramelised (which includes honey and molasses). While further research needs to be undertaken, HMF has been found to have both adverse and beneficial effects on humans (2).

(1)  Annapoorani A, Anilakumar KR, Khanum F, Murthy NA, Bawa AS. Studies on the physicochemical characteristics of heated honey, honey mixed with ghee and their food consumption pattern by rats. Ayu. 2010;31(2):141-146. doi:10.4103/0974-8520.72363

(2)  Shapla UM, Solayman M, Alam N, Khalil MI, Gan SH. 5-Hydroxymethylfurfural (HMF) levels in honey and other food products: effects on bees and human health. Chem Cent J. 2018;12(1):35. Published 2018 Apr 4. doi:10.1186/s13065-018-0408-3

Please note: This post is for educational purposes only, and does not in any way replace dietary, and/or medical advice or care.

COOKING WITH TOFU

AYURVEDIC COOKING: WHAT TO DO WHEN EXPERIMENTING WITH USING TOFU IN YOUR MEALS

Whilst this is not a post on Ayurvedic cooking per se, I do have people wondering how to prepare tofu in a meal. One of my favourite ways is to simply treat it like a steak. Put it in a flat pan, heat it up and add in soy sauce and sear the outside (I use Braggs liquid aminos instead of soy as is is considered healthier and I find tastes better). A few minutes on the stovetop and it is done. Team it up with with cooked veggies and pine nuts and serve it on top of toasted sourdough bread. For an extra bite, use chutney, mustard mayo, or homemade tomato sauce as a condiment. 15 minutes to make. Easy.

FENNEL SEEDS

AYURVEDIC COOKING: FENNEL SEEDS

In Ayurveda, fennel holds a special space in household use, for a number of things, including aiding digestion. With its cooling and sweet properties, it is able to strengthen and warm Agni, which refers to the digestive fire/juices, without provoking the heat element of Pitta.

Fennel is a cooling spice, thanks to its sweet taste with an undertone of bitterness. It also has a reminiscent flavour of a mix of anise/licorice.

Traditionally, eating a small amount of pan roasted (or fresh) fennel seeds after a meal is common practice, aiding in digestion (and separately also acting as a breath freshener). 

Modern research supports this, with fennel’s active ingredients of antioxidant, antispasmodic and anti-flatulent properties, having been shown to help stimulate digestive juices and speed up the gastrointestinal process (1), and in human trials it has also been shown to help to relieve bloating and flatulence in those suffering from IBS (2). 

Used either ground or whole, fennel seeds, contribute a wonderful aroma and flavour to any dish, combining excellently with many other spices, such as cumin, coriander, turmeric, dill, ginger, caraway and fenugreek.

(1)  Valussi M. Functional foods with digestion-enhancing properties. Int J Food Sci Nutr. 2012 Mar;63 Suppl 1:82-9. doi: 10.3109/09637486.2011.627841. Epub 2011 Oct 19. PMID: 22010973.

(1)  Caporaso N, Festi D, Campanale MC, Di Rienzo T, Guarino M, Taddia M, Fogli MV, Grimaldi M, Gasbarrini A. Curcumin and Fennel Essential Oil Improve Symptoms and Quality of Life in Patients with Irritable Bowel Syndrome. J Gastrointestin Liver Dis. 2016 Jun;25(2):151-7. doi: 10.15403/jgld.2014.1121.252.ccm. PMID: 27308645.

Please note: This post is for educational purposes only, and does not in any way replace dietary, and/or medical advice or care.


SAVOURY PIE BASES

AYURVEDIC COOKING: EXPERIMENTING WITH DIFFERENT FLOURS FOR PIE BASES

For many of us, when we think of baking a savoury pie, we simply think of using either white or wholemeal flour. Yet, there are a host of alternative options out there which are healthy and still taste great. These include: rye, spelt, khorason (ancient wheat grain), triticale, teff, oat, barley, quinoa, and amaranth, to name but a few. Some require a bit of mixing with another base to lighten their texture or taste a little, some of the gluten free flours require additions of binding agents such as psyllium. But all are quite delicious in their own right and make a great alternative to wheat. Today's eggplant and pumpkin pie was made with 80% triticale with 20% oat. Simple, easy and delicious.

WHITE PEONY TEA CHAI

AYURVEDIC COOKING: A SOFTER ALTERNATIVE TO CONVENTIONAL CHAI MADE WITH BLACK TEA

Chai has been a staple in the Ayurvedic tradition for centuries. Chai translates as tea - and is consumed by boiling water, milk, black tea, and spices, such cinnamon, cardamon, ginger, star anise, and cloves. 

I love drinking a cup of Chai. It is something I so much look forward to. However, I tend to have a sensitive digestive system, and sometimes find that Chai made fully with black tea leaves can be too harsh on my system.

So lately I have been experimenting with creating different Chai blends, with some really good results.

One such blend is made with 60-80% White Peony tea and 20-40% black tea. It still gives a delicious, robust taste, but with softer floral elements and some really beautiful secondary tastes - and I find it is much softer on my system.

Simply boil the tea leaves in water with with cardamom pods and cinnamon bark, a sprinkle mace or nutmeg, some star anise, and a small piece dried orange rind. After it has boiled for 10-15 minutes on low heat, add in the milk of your choice and simmer for another few minutes.

Please note: This post is for educational purposes only, and does not in any way replace dietary, and/or medical advice or care.

PANEER CHEESE

AYURVEDIC COOKING: PANEER CHEESE

If you ever go to an Indian restaurant, sometimes you may order a vegetarian dish made from paneer - which is a form of soft cheese. 

According to Ayurveda, paneer is actually quite easy to digest. Having said this, if one currently has a very weak digestive system - then even this cheese might be too hard on the GI tract. I know for myself, a few years ago when I was unwell, I really struggled with my digestion, and I could not properly digest paneer (or most things for that matter). Thankfully, these days my digestion is significantly stronger and I can enjoy many a variety of foods.

Paneer is remarkably easy to make at home from a few simple ingredients. I use it in my vegetable dishes, but it is also a fantastic substitute to melted cheese on our pizzas. 

INGREDIENTS:
- 1 litre of full cream organic milk
- 2 tablespoons of apple cider vinegar
- Salt and pepper to taste
- Fresh chopped herbs (optional). I use tend to use spring onions, dill, or marjoram from our garden.

PREPARATION:
- Heat the milk in a saucepan on medium heat.
- Prior to the milk starting to boil, add in the apple cider vinegar and stir rapidly with a wooden spoon. You will start to see the milk solids separating from the whey. Keep stirring until you can see that no more separation needs to occur (approx. 1 minute). Occasionally, you may need to add in a little extra vinegar to get this separation to fully happen.
- Take the pan off the stove. 
- Allow to cool a little and then add in the salt and pepper and chopped herbs.
- Strain the contents through a cheesecloth and allow the paneer cheese to sit in the cheesecloth to continue draining for 2-3 hours, so that it forms a solid cheese.
- Place in fridge and consume within 3-4 days.

Note: Do not throw away the liquid whey as this is makes a fantastic soup base or stock for other dishes (it will keep for a few days in the fridge).

Please note: This post is for educational purposes only, and does not in any way replace dietary, and/or medical advice or care.

CHAPATI: FLAT BREADS

AYURVEDIC COOKING: CHAPATI (FLAT BREADS)

Chapatis

BLACKBERRY PIES

AYURVEDIC COOKING: SIMPLE HOMEMADE BLACKBERRY PIES

TURMERIC CHICKEN FLAT BREADS

AYURVEDIC COOKING: HQUICK< SIMPLE AND EASTY CHICKEN DISH

VEGAN PORRIDGE

AYURVEDIC COOKING: NUTRITIOUS, EASY TO DIGEST VEGAN PORRIDGE

GINGER AND MINT TEA

AYURVEDIC COOKING: MINT AND GINGER TEA STRAIGHT FROM THE GARDEN

HOME MADE PANEER CHEESE PIZZA

AYURVEDIC COOKING: GOURMET HOME BAKED PIZZA

VEGGIES SERVED IN A PRE-BAKED PIE CRUST

AYURVEDIC COOKING: QUICK, SIMPLE AND DELICIOUS VEGGIE PIES

ZUCCHINI QUICHE

CHICKEN PIE

MUNG BEAN SOUP

HOMEMADE CRUNCHY MUESLI

OAT, MILLET AND QUINOA MUESLI MADE WITH GHEE AND BARLEY MALT

Delicious and nutritious, complete with warming spices, this recipe can be altered to put in any type of grains, seeds nuts or spices that you like. 

INGREDIENTS:
NOTE: These quantities are approximate. You can alter them to suit your own tastes and needs.
- 1 cup rolled oats (not quick oats)
- 1 cup millet flakes
- 1 cup quinoa flakes
- ¼ cup sunflower seeds
- ¼  cup raisins or sultanas
- ¼ cup chopped or sliced dried apples
- ¼ tsp cinnamon powder
- 1/6 tsp clove powder
- 3 tablespoons ghee  and 3 tablespoons of liquid sweetener, such as barley malt

PREEPARATION:
- Add and mix all ingredients except ghee and sweetener into a large bowl.
- Gently heat ghee and barley malt in a saucepan to liquid consistency and pour onto dry ingredients.
- Stir well to get the ghee and sweetener to mix in with the dry ingredients.
- Place half in a large flat baking tray and put in oven on low heat until golden brown. You may need to stir every 5-8 minutes. When the first batch is complete, you can bake the second batch.
- Take out of oven and allow to cool.

Serve with warmed soy or other plant based milk and enjoy!


ROAST VEGGIE VARIATION

APPLE RHUBARB AND PISTACHIO

MUNG BEAN DAHL

NOURISHING AUTUMN / SPRING COCONUT AND MUNG BEAN DAHL

Warming seasonal mung bean and coconut dahl. Nourishing, easy to digest and wonderful served with freshly baked bread.

INGREDIENTS
1 cup mung dal/beans (split yellow or whole)
4 cups (approx.) water
Small slice of chopped ginger root, finely chopped
Heaped teaspoon organic/vegan stock powder
2 tsp. ghee
¼ tsp. caraway seeds
¼ tsp. whole cumin seeds
¼ tsp. turmeric powder
1 pinch asafoetida (hing) - optional
Handful of fresh cilantro or parsley leaves - optional
Cup assorted vegetables
½ tin coconut cream

PREPARATION
Soak the mung beans overnight.
Rinse the mung beans separately in at least 2 changes of water.
To a saucepan add the ghee and spices and allow to saute on low heat.
Then add 6 cups of water, mung dal, veggies and organic stock powder and cook covered on low heat (preferably without lid) until it becomes soft.
If need be, add a little salt and pepper to taste.

RED LENTIL DAHL

AROMATIC RED LENTIL DAHL

Food for the soul, and nourishment to the body.

INGREDIENTS
1 cup red lentils
4 cups (approx.) water
Heaped teaspoon organic/vegan stock powder
2 tsp. ghee
¼ tsp. fennel seeds
¼ tsp. whole cumin seeds
¼ tsp. turmeric powder
1 pinch asafoetida (hing) - optional
1 cup assorted vegetables - e.g. baby tomatoes, kale, pumpkin, mushrooms, purple cabbage
2 good tablespoons organic tomato concentrate

PREPARATION
Soak the red lentils overnight.
Rinse the rice and lentils in at least 2 changes of water.
To a saucepan add the ghee and spices and allow to saute on low heat.
Then add approx. 3 cups of water, lentils, veggies and organic stock powder and cook covered on low heat (preferably without lid) until it becomes soft.
If need be, add a little salt and pepper to taste.

 

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